critrepsonse6

critrepsonse6 - 11 December 2007 Professor B.G. Harding ENG...

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11 December 2007 Professor B.G. Harding ENG 3542-001 Critical Response #6 2. In the invocation, the dreamer asks the god of sleep to let him tell his dreams correctly, “And to this god that I of rede / Prey I that he wol me spede / My sweven for to telle aright” (1, 77-79). He also continues to say that if any man misjudges their own dream, “Mysdeme hyt, pray I Jesus God…That every harm that any man / Hath had syth the world began / Befalle hym therof or he sterve”(1, 97-101). So, the dreamer is very strict about correct interpretation and wishes the worst on anyone who misinterprets his or her dreams. Then the dreamer wakes up inside Venus’s temple and sees the tablet with Virgil’s Aenid . The lines describe people fleeing from Troy and the deception involved in the Trojan horse. A tempest comes and ceases and then he discusses the love of Dido and Aeneas and the false nature on loving by appearance. This parallels the dreamer’s discussion about misinterpretation of dreams and how he is so weary of people
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critrepsonse6 - 11 December 2007 Professor B.G. Harding ENG...

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