midterm - 14 June 2007 Professor Bruce Bassoff ENG 4224-100...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 14 June 2007 Professor Bruce Bassoff ENG 4224-100 Midterm 1. In “Two Sisters”, the boy, aunt, and old woman look into Father Flynn’s casket to see him holding a chalice. “There he lay, solemn and copious, vested as for the altar, his large hands loosely retaining a chalice” (p.6). Later, Father Flynn’s madness comes up in a conversation between Eliza and the narrator’s aunt. Eliza dodges speaking about Father Flynn’s madness and changes the subject to Father O’Rourke. She does not want to recognize Flynn’s madness and tries to keep her faith in the institution of the Church through talking about Father O’Rourke instead. Eliza remarks later, “It was the chalice he broke…. That was the beginning of it” (p.10). Immediately the alter boy is blamed for the breaking of the chalice or just simply Father Flynn’s nervousness. The underlying truth is that it would take a great amount of force to break a chalice. Father Flynn probably broke the chalice in a fit of rage because the chalice would not break from merely dropping it on the ground. Father Flynn’s breaking of the chalice is an example of the theme of perversion of the Church within the novel. Joyce comments on Priests attaining their position, not for charity or humility, but for power. Father Flynn sought a powerful position through the priesthood and was eventually driven to madness. The chalice presents itself once again in “Araby” . The narrator seeks a sense of exhilaration from the Bazaar and visiting the market with his aunt. The narrator idealizes every situation including his infatuation with the mysterious brown girl in the story. “Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance” (p.22). The narrator acts almost like an Arthurian knight, questing off into the market place, holding the chalice like a Holy Grail. “…I bore my chalice safely through a throng of foes” (p.23). The narrator insulates himself from real life with his fantasies, like many characters in the novel. The alter reality the narrator inhabits makes what actually happens seem more adventurous and interesting. 3. In “The Boarding House,” Mr. Doran is extremely anxious when he thinks about how all of Dublin, including his employer would learn about his “affair.” “He felt his heart leap warmly in his throat as he heard in his excited imagination old Mr. Leonard calling out in his rasping voice: Send Mr. Doran here, please ” (p.61). ” (p....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 6

midterm - 14 June 2007 Professor Bruce Bassoff ENG 4224-100...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online