Industrialization

Industrialization - HIST 1020 The Industrial Revolution...

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The Industrial Revolution Beginning in the early 1800’s and proceeding into the 1900’s, industrialization paved the way into modern day society through the creation of technologies such as the railroad, urbanization, and the construction of laws and orders in urban areas. The interrelationship between industrialization and the natural world can clearly be seen in the negative effects industrialization has had on the environment. While industrialization had many positive outcomes on the economy, politics, and society, the environmental impacts such as pollution, land shortages, and acid rain had many negative consequences. “The ecological background to the industrial revolution was an acute land shortage” (Wilkinson 80). As the population increased there became less and less land available for agricultural use. Many sectors were dependent on the land. Transportation required animals which grazed off of the land, humans needed it for food, and many industries used the forests for building. As the usable land decreased people were forced to find other sectors of business and substitutes for raw materials. Technology replaced much of the dependence on the land, “all economic relationships take place within an ecological context, and given a set of these relationships it is hardly more than a truism to say that innovations are introduced because of their profitability.” (Wilkinson 97). When it became too expensive to continue practicing something in the current fashion a new technology was introduced. Examples of this are the railway which replaced the use of animals and coal which replaced the use of wood. As industrialization occurred factory towns sprung up where there had not previously been towns before (S. K. Kent Sec. 4) and people began moving from the rural countryside into these factory towns or prominent cities such as London and Paris. These cities unprepared for
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This note was uploaded on 03/18/2009 for the course HIST 1020 taught by Professor Vavara during the Fall '07 term at Colorado.

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Industrialization - HIST 1020 The Industrial Revolution...

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