Taking sides

Taking sides - PSYC 3313. Sec 202. 14 September 2007...

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PSYC 3313. Sec 202. 14 September 2007 Summary: Taking Sides Article Part I Mental health professionals use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , commonly referred to as the DSM , as the standard manual for classifying disorders. Those in favor of using the current addition (the DSM IV ) argue that it does contain the most up to date material from empirical data (Frances, First, Pincus, 2002). They also argue that its categorical model is the most practical, as opposed to those who think that the DSM should take the form of a dimensional model (Frances, First, Pincus, 2002). In addition, researchers do recognize the limitations of the current DSM , as it is a “descriptive system,” however, they note that it should only be used by professional clinicians that are trained to exercise their best judgment according to its contents (Frances, First, Pincus, 2002). Those opposing the DSM IV , argue that despite the additional “900 pages added” to this addition, “it adds only 13 new diagnoses and eliminates eight old ones” (Kutchins & Kirk, 2002). They believe that this extra 50% of content doesn’t contain much new value.
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Taking sides - PSYC 3313. Sec 202. 14 September 2007...

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