3rd test study guide

3rd test study guide - 3 Components of Emotion 3 Expressive behaviors You are on a NY subway alone at night and you see a man holding a knife

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3 Components of Emotion How do the components fit together? Cannon – Bard Theory Example of Cannon – Bard Theory James – Lange Theory Example of James – Lange Theory 1. Physiological changes in our body 2. Subjective cognitive states – conscious labeling of an emotion – I feel sad, I feel angry 3. Expressive behaviors You are on a NY subway alone at night and you see a man holding a knife headed your way. - Physiological changes: heart races, sweating - Subjective cognitive state: You feel scared! - Expressive behavior: You run! An emotionally-provoking event simultaneously produces: - Physiological reaction - Subjective state we label as we label emotions
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You have to give a presentation in class: - Physiological reaction: pulse races, dry mouth, sweating - Emotion: I am afraid The subjective emotional experiences we have are actually the result of physiological changes in our body. Emotion comes after arousal. You must give the presentation. Then your pulse races and you have dry mouth. Then you realize you were afraid. Example of Two – Factor Theory (Method) Example of Two – Factor Theory (Results) Two Dimensions of Emotional Theory Seven Basic Emotions Subjective emotional experiences we have are actually the results of physiological changes in our body. Emotion comes after arousal. BUT How do we know that the arousal we have is anger rather than fear; sadness rather than surprise? Male subjects crossed a very scary bridge. All reported feeling physiological arousal.
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- ½ the subjects had nothing on the other side of the bridge - ½ the subjects had an attractive female on the other side of the bridge. All men were asked how they felt at the end of the bridge Group seeing nothing at the end of the bridge felt “fear” Group seeing attractive woman felt “attraction” All emotions fall along two dimensions - Arousal level: low high - Valence level: high low PV, LA: Content PV, HA: Elation, Joy, Surprise NV. LA: Sadness, Boredom NV, HA: Anger, Anxious - Sadness - Fear - Anger - Disgust - Contempt - Happiness - Surprise Evolutionary explanation of there being a universal facial language Facial Feedback Hypothesis Evidence of there being a universal facial language Cultural differences in emotion Autonomic Nervous System controls arousal Sympathetic
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Parasympathetic Communication before words – needed for survival Facial expressions regulate our environment Facial expressions regulate our emotions Facial Feedback Hypothesis Facial expressions do not only reflect emotional experience but also help determine how people experience and label emotions. No culture variation
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2009 for the course PSYCH 100 taught by Professor Cave during the Spring '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

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3rd test study guide - 3 Components of Emotion 3 Expressive behaviors You are on a NY subway alone at night and you see a man holding a knife

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