BSC 2010L Practical

BSC 2010L Practical - BSC 2010L Practical Domain Bacteria...

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Unformatted text preview: BSC 2010L Practical Domain Bacteria Domain Archaea Domain Eukarya: Kingdom Euglenozoa: Phylum Euglenophyta : ( e.g. euglena, phacus) (1 ) (2) (1) Euglena are photosynthetic protists with both chlorophylls a and b. They use flagella for locomotion. (2) Phacu s lacks chloroplasts and is heterotrophic. Phylum Kinoplastida : (e. (1) (2) (1) Trichonympha lives in the gut of termites. This is an example of mutualistic symbiosis because trichonympha digests cellulose from wood eaten by the termite. (2) Trypanosoma are associated with red blood cells in the disease called African sleeping sickness. Kingdom Alveolata Phylum Ciliophora: (e.g . paracium, stentor, vorticella) (1a) (1)Note the large pink macronucleus and cilia in this paramecium. The contractile vacuoles in this paramecium . The cells are also surrounded by cilia. (1b)Binary Fission - the asexual process of splitting one cell into two. Note the large, dark macronuclei in each cell. Several round food vacuoles are also visible. (1c)Two paramecia line up along their long axes to exchange half their micronucleus. After the exchange, both cells will divide. This process is an example of conjugation (sexual reproduction). (2) (3) (2)This Stentor has a large macronucleus that looks like a string of red pearls. On the right side of the image, note the opening surrounded by cilia used to move food items into the cell. (3) This Vorticella has cilia and a whip like extension that allows the cell to hold on to the substrate (surface on which the cell lives). The extension is coiled in the picture, but can extend rapidly to allow the cell to pounce on prey. Kingdom Stramenopila Phylum Ooomycota: (e.g. Achlya, water molds) (1a) (1b) (1c) (1a) Achlya-Mature (1b)oomycete wit Phylum Bacillariophyta: (e.g. Diatoms) (1) (1) Diatoms are aquatic, chiefly marine, protists which are either unicellular or form colonies of filaments. They alone produce about 80% of the oxygen in the atmosphere. Phylum Phaeophyta (1a) (1b) (1a) Fucus (brown algae) Kingdom Amoebozoa Phylum Rhizopoda : (1a) (1b) (2) (1) Amoeba move by pseudopodia and use phagocytosis to ingest food particles. (2) Difflugia are similar to amoeba, but possess a shell made of sand particles glued together. (Moon/star) Phylum Myxogastrida : (1a) (1b) (1a)This plasmodium , belonging to a member of the genus, Physarum, is the multinucleate feeding stage of this plasmodial slime mold. (1b) plasmodial slime mold Phylum Gy mnamoeba (amoebas) Phylum Dictyostelida (cellular slime molds) Kingdom Animalia Parazoa-no true tissue Phylum Porifera (i.e. sponges) (1a) (1b) (1c) (1a) Grantia (l.s.) (1b) Grantis Spicules (1c) Grantis (2) (2)Sponges Body Symmetry-Asymmetrical to radial Tissue Organization-No true tissue Locomotion-Sessile Support-Spicules spongin Gas Exchange-Diffusion Digestive-intercellular, suspension feeders Circulation-radial canals Reproduction-both sexual and asexual Excretion- diffusion of ammonia Nervous system-none Unique Features-Choanocytes creates currents in sponges Phylum Cnidaria (1a) (1 b) (1a) Hydra (1b) Hydra Cross Section (1a)...
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BSC 2010L Practical - BSC 2010L Practical Domain Bacteria...

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