Carbohydrate Bio Lab Report

Carbohydrate Bio Lab Report - Optimum Carbohydrates for...

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Optimum Carbohydrates for Yeast Fermentation Trent A. Clark November 13, 2006 Section 0530
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Abstract The purpose of this experiment was to determine the optimum carbohydrate used to undergo the most productive yeast fermentation process. Using previous knowledge based on the bonds of the molecules I hypothesize that the smaller molecules with weak bonds will undergo fermentation at a faster rate since they will be able to break their bonds and interact with the yeast cells quicker. This idea was put to the test by using various carbohydrate substrates mixed with yeast and placed in Smith’s fermentation tubes and then measuring the amount of CO 2 evolved. After undergoing the experiment the data was then collected and converted to the amount of CO 2 and then graphed so that the collected information could be easily read. After careful analysis my hypothesis proved to be partially correct; I made the mistake of guessing that glucose was smaller with weaker bonds when in actuality sucrose is and thus carried out the process of fermentation at the optimum rate. 2
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Introduction Fermentation is the anaerobic process in which the final product is ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide. This process only occurs when there is a lack of oxygen within the system and ATP within the cells is needed due to the fact that the process gradually wears away the overall cell (Campbell and Reece, 2005). While this method is no where near energy efficient as the full process of respiration, it is still ideal for plants that must live in harsh conditions. While fermentation usually takes long periods of time for certain reactions to complete, there are certain substrates that may be used over others to acquire a faster rate of fermentation. The rate of change differs from the various substrates due to their bond structure; by studying the structure and decomposition of these bonds the optimum substrate for yeast fermentation may be decided upon. The structure of a substrates bonds either allows for a smooth and quick fermentation process or and slow and energy consuming process. Based on Vliet’s (1993) research the reaction in fermentation requires for a substrate to come in contact with the yeast cell, however, if the substrate is too large then it must be first broken down into smaller particles so that it may enter the yeast cell. This minor step takes up more energy that the reaction is already being deprived of thus leading to a slower fermentation process and an overall less efficient reaction. On the other hand, if the substrate is small
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Carbohydrate Bio Lab Report - Optimum Carbohydrates for...

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