Lecture Notes - Jomon Period c 10,000 c 300 B.C Origin of...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Jomon Period: c. 10,000 – c. 300 B.C. Origin of Japan o There is no direct descendant of Jomon people now (concept of homogeneous Japanese race is false.) Theory o In 1970s and 1980s, diffusion (immigration invasion) was a key to consider cultural change, and scholars ignored local development shift of individual societies. People from the continent and from local powerful families chased Jomon people away to Hokkaido and Okinawa. However, recent genetic research shows that there is no significant difference between Japanese and Ainu, Ryukyu-jin. Also, there is no archeological evidence of sudden cultural change due to warfare and invasion. It was a gradual cultural shift from Jomon to Yayoi. Language, Lifestyle (customs), religion Jomon style? Ainu escaped from conflict – moved to Hokkaido area -- Kami in Ancient Japan o Translation of Kami in Japan into gods or deities is false (spirit is closer). o Kami automatically inhabits nature, and stays in trees, rocks, plants, mountains, rivers, oceans, foods, animals, and people (divine figures such as Amaterasu). o Kami is extraordinary divine nature which appears throughout the natural universe.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
o There is no single creator, and there were no specific ranking systems among Japanese kami. o Japanese people consider that Kami is everywhere. o Movie Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke, and many others contain the concepts of Kami o It is very unique that people maintain and appreciate type of institutionalized animism until 21 st century o Shinto represents Japanese’ appreciation to spirits in nature for thousands of years o 85,000 Shinto shrines Types of Shinto o Imperial House-based Shinto o shrine Shinto Jomon pottery o The oldest in the world o Jomon means patterns of rope, and many wares have been highly decorated. o Dogu ritual objects, purpose unknown o Jomon ornaments o Sannai Maruyama in A Yayoi period – 300 B.C. – c. A.D. 300 o Pottery – found in Yayoi-cho in Tokyo difference from Jomon ones- thinner and less decorated
Image of page 2
used for serving and storing rice and other foods o Rice crop on the rice field (wet-rice agriculture) – 500-300b.c. o rice culture did not spread well to Hokkaido and Okinawa (kept Jomon lifestyle) because of rich resources from ocean, people in these areas kept their fishery o warfare everywhere inside/outside Japan o China 221-206 bc qin kingdom established first empire, started to build great wall 202bc-220ad – han dynasty, beginning of silk road Ad 220-581 period of three kingdoms o Korea 1-7 th centuries ad; paekche, silla, and gogureo competed for supremacy Kofun (tomb) period 300-552 ad o Emergence of gigantic tombs of rulers called Kofun, mainly in kinki area o Yamato dynasty developed in kinki area o Ultimately exercised power over clans in major areas of Japan (except for northern part) o Acquisition of iron and control of resource networks was significant for yamato dynasty o Kofun – major tombs were key-hole shaped o
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern