The years of hope and idealism 1960

The years of hope and idealism 1960 - I The years of hope...

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I. The years of hope and idealism 1960-1963 a. The sit-ins i. The first group of students to do sit-in’s were the Greensboro four, at a  local store ii. The sit-in movement spread rapidly across the south, always dressed  nicely, acting politely, students read Thoreau’s essay civil disobedience,  and the Bible iii. The sit-ins were the first stage of the national civil rights movement b. Law vs. tradition i. Under the law, all men were equal, but some places black students  couldn’t vote because of local officials not allowing them to vote ii. Martin Luther King Jr. claimed they were going to “love segregation to  death” iii. Sit-ins stimulated more student activism iv. The traditional response 1. White youth would threaten blacks 2. Officials formed committees to “study” proposals, while pressuring  black leaders to control the youth and universities to expel  activists 3. Local police would arrest peaceful activists for “inciting a riot” v. Repression in the past had usually worked but not in 1960, it actually did  the opposite vi. Another reason for activism was growing up in cold war America, a very  patriotic era, beginning school with the pledge, and spouting “all men are  created equal” c. The torch has been passed
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i. John Kennedy inspired many in his bid for democratic nomination 1. Sit-ins forced kennedy to consider civil rights as a key issue 2. Martin luther King Jr. was arrested and Kennedy called his wife 
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