Oxyuris equis TrmPpr - A Microscopic Look At Oxyuris Equi Laboratory Procedures 108 Susan Ring Derosset The horse pinworm is a very unique parasite

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A Microscopic Look At Oxyuris Equi Laboratory Procedures 108 Susan Ring Derosset April 26, 2007 The horse pinworm is a very unique parasite which acts in a way that separates it from its fellow ascarids. Being an ascarid it is a member of the nematode phylum, family Oxyuroidae and genus Oxyuris . Simply knowing a little
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about this worm’s taxonomic classification can reveal quite a large amount of information. Oxyuris equi is more commonly known as the horse pinworm, and like its phylum states, it is a roundworm harboring a simple pseudocoelom with very few other internal structures. This simple bodied worm is common “in all parts of the world” (Soulsby, 1982) and only infects equids. They are not a zoonotic parasite nor can they be passed to other species. The adult pinworm is fairly simple to identify as they live up to their name having an elaborate pin pointed tale. “The males are 9-12 mm long, with small caudal alae, one spicule, and no gubernaculum. The females are 40-150 mm long. Some have short tails and others have long tails. The tail alone may constitute half to three-quarters the length of the female. The eggs are 85-95x40-45 u m , operculated, and flattened on one side.” (Barriga, 1997) When viewed under a microscope the eggs are thin shelled with a smooth light zygote or larva on the inside. After being laid “the eggs drop to the ground, and become infective in four to five days, the host being infected by ingestion of the egg containing the L 3 . These eggs have a very poor capacity for survival, and are only viable for a few days on the ground.” (Dunn, 1978) Once the host ingests the egg, it then travels through the digestive tract where it will reach maturity. Oxyuris equi does not need any other host in order to complete its life cycle. It has a direct life cycle where the eggs travel to the small intestine and hatch. They then begin migration to the large intestine to mature. The migration through the mucosa may be the most harmful thing the pinworm does while inhabiting the host itself and this rather undisruptive movement of the pinworm normally goes unnoticed by the
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2008 for the course VET 121 taught by Professor Ringderosset during the Fall '07 term at Front Range Community College.

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Oxyuris equis TrmPpr - A Microscopic Look At Oxyuris Equi Laboratory Procedures 108 Susan Ring Derosset The horse pinworm is a very unique parasite

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