Gender-&-Kinship

Gender-&-Kinship - Gender and Kinship: What makes a...

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Gender and Kinship: Gender and Kinship: What makes a family? What makes a family?
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Kinship: culturally defined relationships between individuals who are commonly thought of as having family ties. Kinship is often, but not always, based on marriage or descent – this definition is being revised and challenged, as this week’s texts demonstrate. Kinship
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Fictive Kinship Fictive kinship: a socially recognized link between individuals created as an expedient for dealing with special circumstances, such as the bond between a godmother and her godchild. Fictive kinship bonds are based on friendship and other personal relationships rather than marriage and descent. This term is now rarely used since all kin relations are in some sense socially constructed.
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What is the “nuclear family”? Nuclear family: a term originating in Western culture to describe a family group and household consisting of parents (usually a father and mother) and their children. Generally, the trend to shift from extended to nuclear family structures has been supported by the spread of western values.
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Malinowski, the father of ethnography, claimed that the nuclear family pattern was human universal, reflecting the early Euro- centric biases of the discipline. (cerca 1920)
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Search for kinship universals to a focus on relationships
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Mati women of Afro-Surinamese households in South America. Social groups create meaningful bonds through any number of intimate relationships.
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Not only do “families” come in many forms, they do not necessarily depend on procreation to reproduce themselves. Houses of the Kwakiutl of the Northwest Coast of North America contained people who shared a multiplicity of links but not necessarily genealogical ties.
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Social Power Social Power
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Patriarchy (from Greek: patria meaning father and arché meaning rule) is the term used to define the condition where male members of a society tend to predominate in positions of power (both familial and political); the more powerful the
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Gender-&-Kinship - Gender and Kinship: What makes a...

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