Gender-Violence-&-Political-Conflict

Gender-Violence& - Gender Violence and Political Conflict Dirty Protest Symbolic OverDetermination and Gender in Northern Ireland Ethnic

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Gender, Violence, and Gender, Violence, and Political Conflict Political Conflict
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Dirty Protest: Symbolic Over- Dirty Protest: Symbolic Over- Determination and Gender in Determination and Gender in Northern Ireland Ethnic Northern Ireland Ethnic Violence Violence By Begoña Aretxaga By Begoña Aretxaga
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Irish Republican Army (IRA) Irish national Liberation Army (INLA) Nationalist/Republican: used interchangeably for the mainly Catholic resistance (IRA & INLA) to British rule. Loyalist/Unionist: used interchangeably for the (mainly Protestant) residents loyal to British rule in Northern Ireland.
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Events Leading up to the Dirty Protest: 1969: Riots in North Ireland; Arrests in working class communities 1972: Prisoners given “special category” status, as de facto political prisoners. 1976: As part of “counterinsurgency” effort, British government withdraws special category status. Prisoners respond by wearing blankets; prison responds by forcing them to not wear blankets on trips out of their rooms. Violent searches lead to dirty protest by men in Long Kesh Prison. 1978: Women, because of violent searches for symbolically “Republican clothes” decide to join their comrades in the dirty protest; sexual overtones of the assault. An attempt to discipline through punishment but also an assertion of male dominance.
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Mothers and Wives outside Long Kesh Prison protesting the men’s treatment in the prison.
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Body as Site of Discipline: Body as Site of Discipline: Disciplinary Power Disciplinary Power Foucault-- Discipline and Punish: The Birth of Foucault-- Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison the Prison Discipline developed a new economy and Discipline developed a new economy and politics for bodies. politics for bodies. Modern institutions required that bodies must be Modern institutions required that bodies must be individuated according to their tasks, as well as individuated according to their tasks, as well as for training, observation, and control. for training, observation, and control.
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course SOA 302 taught by Professor Araujo during the Spring '08 term at Northeastern.

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Gender-Violence& - Gender Violence and Political Conflict Dirty Protest Symbolic OverDetermination and Gender in Northern Ireland Ethnic

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