Intersectionality-Race-Class-Ethnicity

Intersectionality-Race-Class-Ethnicity - Understanding...

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Understanding Understanding Interlocking Nature of Interlocking Nature of Oppressions: Oppressions: Race, Class, Ethnicity, Gender, Sexual Orientation
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Classroom Discussion Speak to your own experience, use the “I” form instead of conjecturing about the experience of others or passing judgment on others. For course presentations, remember the first 20 minutes to be for the presentation but the bulk of the presentation should be spent on facilitating class discussion.
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The SocialClass.org Definition of The SocialClass.org Definition of Wealthy (2004) Wealthy (2004) Poor Lower Middle True Middle Upper Middle Rich (Upper) *Income < $15,000 (< $30,000 in big cities) $15,000 - $35,000 (<50k in big cities) $35,000 - $75,000 ($50k- $150k in big cities) >$75,000 (>$150,000 in big cities) >$1,000,000 Assets <$10,000 <$55,000 <$500,000 $368,000 (<30 yrs old), $1,000,000 (<60 years old), $5,000,000 otherwise >5,000,000 if <45 yrs old, >$7,000,000 if <60 yrs old, else >$8,000,000) % of the population 20% 29% 33% 17% 1% *In order to qualify for the upper income strata, you must be able to produce at least $400,000 annually through earned or inherited wealth (ex. the income must be produced without any household member actually working). Income is defined as capital gains, interest, rents, royalties, etc., as apart and distinct from actual accounting income and/or realized gains. Note that this is a definition of wealth, not socioeconomic status (class).
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Wealth distribution in the United States
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Distribution of wealth in the U.S., 1990s Distribution of wealth in the U.S., 1990s 1% of the population owns 48% of the wealth 80% of the population owns 6% of the wealth 19% of the population owns 46% of the wealth
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Economic aspects of class: the amount Economic aspects of class: the amount of income or wealth possessed by of income or wealth possessed by households or individuals households or individuals
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Class Inequality in the U.S. Class Inequality in the U.S. The wealthiest 1% of Americans have more wealth than the poorest 95% Americans combined. The net worth of the top 1% is 2.4 times the net combined worth of the poorest 80% Americans. The wealth of the wealthiest 400 Americans increases $32,500 an hour; the hourly minimum wage in the U.S. (federal law) is $5.15. Over the last 5 years, the rich have gotten 55% richer and the poor have gotten more than 6% poorer. The United States has the most unequal distribution of wealth of all industrialized nations.
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Class Inequality in the World Class Inequality in the World The world’s 225 richest people own more than the combined wealth of the world’s 2.5 billion poorest people. Just 4% of the income of the world’s
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course SOA 302 taught by Professor Araujo during the Spring '08 term at Northeastern.

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Intersectionality-Race-Class-Ethnicity - Understanding...

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