CHAPTER 12 - CHAPTER 12 STATISTICAL INFERENCE: OTHER...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 12 – STATISTICAL INFERENCE: OTHER ONE-SAMPLE TEST STATISTICS 12.1 Introduction to Other One-Sample Test Statistics What we’re doing in this chapter: applying the 5 step null hypothesis testing format (from  chapter 10) and the confidence-interval procedure (from chapter 11) to a sample proportion and  correlation. In chapters 10 and 11 we learned ways to use a sample mean to make decisions about a  population mean. Now, we are using the same procedures, with slight modifications, to make  decisions about a population proportion and a population correlation. 12.2 One-Sample z Test and Confidence Interval for a Proportion We are often interested in testing a hypothesis about a population proportion. Examples Dr. Kirk  gives: “An opinion pollster may want to know whether a majority of the voters favor a certain  candidate,” etc. p.308. In each case, we have a large number of occasions or independent trials, in which 1 of 2  outcomes can occur, and the probabilities associated with the 2 outcomes remain constant from  trial to trial. (Remember the scenario where we tossed the fair coin over and over and over…  Tossing the coin once was a Bernoulli trial and the number of successes when tossing it 2 or  more times was a Binomial random variable. This was in Chapter 8 Section 4) The 2 outcomes are “success” and “failure.” Probability of success: p Probability of failure: 1-p Remember from Section 9.2 that the normal distribution can be used to approximate binomial  probabilities. This approximation is excellent if n (sample size) is large and p (probability of  success) is equal to .5; the approximation becomes poorer as n gets smaller or as p  approaches either 0 or 1. Rule of thumb – the normal approximation is satisfactory if 1. The population is at least 10 times larger than the sample, 2. np 0  and n(1-p 0 ) are both greater than 15 (where np 0  is the sample size multiplied by the value  of the population proportion specified in the null hypothesis (remember the 3 choices of “signs”  for the null hypothesis -> H 0 : p≥p 0 , p≤p 0 , or p= p 0 )). 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A z statistic  for testing a null hypothesis about a population proportion is where   is the sample estimator of the population proportion and is given by   is the value of the population proportion specified in the null hypothesis, and   is the size of the random sample used to compute  . The z statistic
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course STATS 2402-04 taught by Professor Kirk during the Spring '08 term at Baylor.

Page1 / 9

CHAPTER 12 - CHAPTER 12 STATISTICAL INFERENCE: OTHER...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online