CHAPTER 8 - CHAPTER 8: RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 8: RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS 8.2 Random Sampling Inferential statistics are used in determining characteristics of a population by observing a  sample from the population Random sampling –  the method of drawing samples from a population so that every possible  sample of a particular size has the same probability of being selected Random sample –  sample produced from a random sampling procedure Randomness is a property of the procedure, not of the particular sample obtained Nonrandom sampling –  sampling methods based on haphazard or purposeless choices such  as every 10 th  name in a list, etc. Resulting samples do not provide a sound basis for determining  the properties of populations Inferential procedures assume either random sampling from a population or random assignment  of participants to the various conditions of an experiment No guarantee that a particular random sample will resemble the population Random assignment to conditions of an experiment helps to ensure that systematic bias is not  introduced Defining the Population Population –  collection of all people, objects, events, or observations having one or more  specified characteristics Element –  a single person, object, event, or observation from the population; can be finite or  infinite Finite –  limited in number Infinite –  not limited in number 2 obstacles making it difficult to obtain a random sample from large populations: 1. Obtaining an  accurate list of the population elements, and 2. Securing their participation once they have been  selected
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sampling with or without Replacement Sampling  with replacement –  a sampled element is returned to the population so that it is  available to be drawn again; rarely appropriate in behavioral and medical sciences because  often the sampled elements may be significantly and permanently altered by participating in the  experiment Sampling  without replacement –  a sampled element is not returned to the population so it can  only be drawn once Random Sampling Procedures If a finite population, identify each element on a slip of paper and place the slips into a  container, thoroughly mix, and draw blindly from the container Flip a coin or spin a roulette wheel with the outcome of the random device determining whether  or not the element is included in the sample; practical for small samples, not for larger ones Most researchers prefer to use a table of random numbers. See Appendix Table D.1. The digits  are in groups of two to make it easier to read but the grouping has no other significance Using a Table of Random Numbers
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course STATS 2402-04 taught by Professor Kirk during the Spring '08 term at Baylor.

Page1 / 7

CHAPTER 8 - CHAPTER 8: RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online