Author final draft - 1 Zeeshan Saleem ENGL 1302-P15 Professor Kennedy The Life of Arthur Charles Clarke Science fiction icon Arthur C Clarke was one of

Author final draft - 1 Zeeshan Saleem ENGL 1302-P15...

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1 Zeeshan Saleem 11-28-15 ENGL 1302-P15 Professor Kennedy The Life of Arthur Charles Clarke Science fiction icon Arthur C. Clarke was one of the world's best-selling authors of science fiction and was widely considered one of the masters of the genre. Compared with authors like Isaac Asimov and Robert A. Heinlein, he was specifically identified for his novels Childhood's End, Rendezvous with Rama, and 2001: A Space Odyssey . Clarke's fiction is credited with combining flawlessly accurate technical details with themes such as "spiritual" rebirth and the search for man's place in the universe. While being the recipient of at least three Hugo Awards and two Nebulas, as well as a host of other acknowledgements, he was also well recognized as an inventor, an editor, and a science commentator. According to Biography.com, “ Arthur Charles Clarke was born 16 December 1917 in the English coastal town of Minehead, in Somerset”(Pg. 1). The eldest of four children, he enjoyed stargazing as a child and had a great enthusiasm for sci-fi magazine. When Clarke was 14 his father died and the family's savings declined. His mother offered riding lessons to offset their money troubles, but she was unable to provide enough money for her son to attend university. Clarke was forced to look for work, at last taking a position as an auditor, but continued to pursue his earlier scientific interests. According to Jacob Smith’s biography of Clarke, “his apartment eventually became headquarters to the British Interplanetary Society, with Arthur
2 becoming its chairman in 1949” (Smith, Pg 1). Even as he served as a radar specialist in the RAF during World War II, he was simultaneously writing and submitting science fiction stories and technical papers. His first piece of fiction to see publication was " Rescue Party ", in Astounding Science, May 1946. As claimed by Encyclopedia Britannica, “Of his various technical and scientific papers, one of them, ‘ Can Rocket Stations Give Worldwide Radio Coverage ?’ introduced the concept that geostationary satellites could make excellent telecommunications relays”(Britannica, Pg. 1). So influential was this work that Clarke is credited as the inventor of the first communications satellite, a scientific development which earned him the gold medal of the Franklin Institute, the Lindbergh Award, the Marconi Award, the Vikram Sarabhai Professorship of the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, and the Fellowship of King's College, London. In addition, the geostationary orbit, which is about 42,000 kilometers above Earth, is named "The Clarke Orbit". In 1954, almost ten years after this development, Clarke's correspondence with Dr. Harry Wexler led to a new branch of meteorology

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