Waking up from the American Dream - Issa 1 Omar Issa Prof...

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Issa 1 Omar Issa Prof. Mary Samuelson English Comp III 11 July 2016 Waking up from the American Dream Since its founding, America has been recognized as the land of ultimate freedom and opportunity. At the heart of this country is the American Dream—a belief that every hardworking person, regardless of background, religion, or race, can find equal opportunity in the United States. However, the nature of the American Dream has made it an attractive target for corporations to repackage and re-sell it it as a means of producing profit. While some may argue that these corporate advertisements promote a more egalitarian society, marketing any product using the American Dream today mainly serves to reinforce stereotypes and proves that social, political, and economic hierarchies do in fact exist in modern-day America—the American dream has two faces. Through their advertising, companies promote a culture in which Americans need to cling onto status symbols in order to be accomplished. Through the analysis of Rolex advertisements published over the course of several decades, the duality of the American Dream that corporations work so hard to package and sell to everyday Americans will be revealed. Since its founding in 1905, Rolex has had only one slogan: “A crown for every achievement.” Its marketing campaigns heavily revolve around the achievements of world leaders, famous actors, and some of the world’s most talented athletes. Through its advertising, Rolex maintains its status as the ultimate luxury watch, and doesn’t hesitate to sell the American Dream in order to do so. However, the American Dream incorporated into these campaigns
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Issa 1 promotes a competitively elitist society rather than one that is completely equal. In 1965, Rolex published an ad for its all new ‘Submariner’ watch, dedicating an entire page to a feminine hand gently brushing her hand against a Rolex on a man’s wrist. Through this ad, where the man is wearing a suit and is holding a fancy glass, Rolex is selling the American Dream by inexplicitly
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