Grand Inquisitor Dialectic

Grand Inquisitor Dialectic - 1. The Grand Inquisitor feels...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. The Grand Inquisitor feels that humans are weak and unable to handle the responsibility of that freedom. In order for the “sinful and rebellious [to] become obedient … [there must be someone] to endure the freedom which they have found so dreadful, and to rule over them” (27). The Grand Inquisitor feels that, because “[Christ] hand[ed] on [his] work to [them],” the job of the Church is to work in the best interests of humankind, which is to relieve men from the burden of freewill (24). Furthermore, because Christ refused to jump off a pinnacle, he further disappointed mankind, as “man seeks not so much God as the miraculous” (29). The Grand Inquisitor feels that mankind does not have the strength to trust in God without the help of miracles. 2. Ivan’s concern for human suffering is related to his poem Grand Inquisitor because the Grand Inquisitor relates all of the suffering of mankind to Christ’s actions. For example, throughout history, many have, “for the sake of common
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/28/2008 for the course PHIL 201 taught by Professor Bowman during the Spring '08 term at Gonzaga.

Page1 / 2

Grand Inquisitor Dialectic - 1. The Grand Inquisitor feels...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online