Chapter25&26Sum07

Chapter25&26Sum07 - Plant Tissues Chapter 25 Recognize...

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Plant Tissues Chapter 25 Recognize this from lab?
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Objectives Look at differences between monocots and eudicots Plant body parts Specialized body parts 3 kinds of plant cells 3 tissue systems Plant growth
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How do the giant sequoias survive? How is water transported from their roots to 100 meters away to the stems?
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The General Sherman has been growing for about 2,500 years! Perennial plants – grow for three or more years
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Fig. 25-15, p.425 Monocot Eudicot
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p.416a Eudicot Monocot
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A few examples of: Monocots Eudicots Grass & Wheat Rice, Corn & Barley Orchids & Palms Lilies & Bamboo Asparagus Onions & Bananas Fruit trees Dandelion & Poison Ivy Cacti Nut trees & Citrus trees Cotton plants
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Eudicot and Monocot
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Angiosperm seedlings
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Monocots and eudicots differ in seed leaf number and in the structure of roots, stems, leaves, and flowers Figure 31.2 SEED LEAVES LEAF VEINS STEMS FLOWERS ROOTS MONOCOTS One cotyledon Main veins usually parallel Vascular bundles in complex arrangement Floral parts usually in multiples of three Fibrous root system Two cotyledons Main veins usually branched Vascular bundles arranged in ring Floral parts usually in multiples of four or five Taproot usually present DICOTS
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Apical dominance Plant Body Parts
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The shoot system Functions: 1. 2. 3. 4.
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p.432b
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The root system Functions of roots: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
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Specialized body parts
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Kudzu: An example of a modified stem (runner) The vines grow as much as a foot per day during summer months, climbing trees, power poles, and anything else they contact. Under ideal conditions kudzu vines can grow sixty feet each year. http://www.alabamatv.org/kudzu/
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Bamboo has rhizomes, this makes it difficult to contain bamboo in landscapes.
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Modified leaves include tendrils and spines Tendrils help plants to climb Spines may protect the plant from plant-eating animals Benjamin Cummings
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Ceiba tree – aerial roots support tall trunks of tropical trees
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Prop roots of corn
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