Ch20_IM_Daft AISE - Chapter 20 Communication Chapter...

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This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. Chapter 20 Communication Chapter Outline I. Communication and the Manager’s Job A. What Is Communication? B. The Communication Process II. Communicating Among People A. Communication Channels B. Communicating to Persuade and Influence Others C. Nonverbal Communication D. Listening III. Organizational Communication A. Formal Communication Channels B. Team Communication Channels C. Personal Communication Channels IV. Communicating during Turbulent Times A. Open Communication B. Dialogue C. Crisis Communication D. Feedback and Learning V. Managing Organizational Communication A. Barriers to Communication B. Overcoming Communication Barriers Annotated Learning Objectives After studying this chapter, students should be able to: 1. Explain why communication is essential for effective management and describe how nonverbal behavior and listening affect communication among people . Communication is defined as the process by which information is exchanged and understood by two or more people, usually with the intent to motivate or influence
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This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. 538 PART 6 Leading behavior. Communication means to share, not just to speak or to write. This distinction between sharing and proclaiming is crucial for successful management. Managers spend at least 80 percent of every working day in direct communication with others. The other 20 percent of a manager’s time is spent doing deskwork, most of which is also communication in the form of reading and writing. Nonverbal communication refers to messages sent through human actions and behaviors rather than through words. Managers are watched, and their behavior, appearance, actions, and attitudes are symbolic of what they value and expect of others. Major parts of the shared understanding from communication come from the nonverbal messages of facial expression, voice, mannerisms, posture, and dress. Nonverbal messages convey thoughts and feelings with greater force than do our most carefully selected words. When verbal and nonverbal messages are contradictory, the receiver will usually give more weight to the nonverbal than verbal message. Listening involves the skill of grasping both facts and feelings to interpret a message’s genuine meaning. Only then can the manager provide the appropriate response. Listening requires attention, energy, and skill. A good listener finds areas of interest, is flexible, works hard at listening, and uses thought speed to mentally summarize, weigh, and anticipate what the speaker says. The listener is responsible for message reception, which is a vital link in the communication process. 2.
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Ch20_IM_Daft AISE - Chapter 20 Communication Chapter...

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