Immigrants Facing Deportation by U.S. Hospitals - Series - NYTimes.com

Immigrants Facing - Immigrants Facing Deportation by U.S Hospitals Series NYTimes.com 3:39 PM HOME PAGE MY TIMES TODAY'S PAPER VIDEO MOST POPULAR

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9/11/08 3:39 PM Immigrants Facing Deportation by U.S. Hospitals - Series - NYTimes.com Page 1 of 9 Advertise on NYTimes.com Enlarge This Image Josh Haner/The New York Times Luis Alberto Jiménez, an illegal immigrant injured in a car accident in Florida, was treated at a community hospital, which eventually sent him back to Guatemala. He spends most of his days inside a one-room house; only the presence of visitors, who can help him into his wheelchair, gives him the rare chance to get out of bed. More Photos » Getting Tough Repatriating the Sick This is the second article in a series that explores efforts by government and others to compel illegal immigrants to leave the United States. Multimedia Far From Indiantown Related Getting Tough: States Take New Tack on Illegal Immigration (June 9, 2008) COMMENTS (634) SIGN IN TO E-MAIL OR SAVE THIS PRINT REPRINTS SHARE Immigrants Facing Deportation by U.S. Hospitals By DEBORAH SONTAG Published: August 3, 2008 JOLOMCÚ, Guatemala — High in the hills of Guatemala, shut inside the one-room house where he spends day and night on a twin bed beneath a seriously outdated calendar, Luis Alberto Jiménez has no idea of the legal battle that swirls around him in the lowlands of Florida. Shooing away flies and beaming at the tiny, toothless elderly mother who is his sole caregiver, Mr. Jiménez, a knit cap pulled tightly on his head, remains cheerily oblivious that he has come to represent the collision of two deeply flawed American systems, immigration and health care. Eight years ago, Mr. Jiménez, 35, an illegal immigrant working as a gardener in Stuart, Fla., suffered devastating injuries in a car crash with a drunken Floridian. A community hospital saved his life, twice, and, after failing to find a rehabilitation center willing to accept an uninsured patient, kept him as a ward for years at a cost of $1.5 million. What happened next set the stage for a continuing legal battle with nationwide repercussions: Mr. Jiménez was deported — not by the federal government but by the hospital, Martin Memorial. After winning a state court order that would later be declared invalid, Martin Memorial leased an air ambulance for $30,000 and “forcibly returned him to his home country,” as one hospital administrator described it. Since being hoisted in his wheelchair up a steep slope to his remote home, Mr. Jiménez, who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury , has received no medical care or medication — just Alka-Seltzer and prayer, his 72-year-old mother said. Over the last year, his condition has deteriorated with routine violent seizures , each characterized by a fall, protracted convulsions , a loud gurgling, the vomiting of blood and, finally, a collapse into unconsciousness . “Every time, he loses a little more of himself,” his mother, Petrona Gervacio
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2009 for the course HPBR 1710 taught by Professor Mendel during the Fall '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Immigrants Facing - Immigrants Facing Deportation by U.S Hospitals Series NYTimes.com 3:39 PM HOME PAGE MY TIMES TODAY'S PAPER VIDEO MOST POPULAR

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