Mesopotamia 2

Mesopotamia 2 - In the third millennium, well-established...

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Unformatted text preview: In the third millennium, well-established cities dotted the Mesopotamian plain. It’s very likely that these cities had internal canals, as well as river access to the cities. The cities had expanded sufficiently that they began to come into conflicts with their neighbors. All these cities emerging at the same time suggests a degree of interaction. The cities attempted to imitate each other, and outdo each other. The dominant features in any Mesopotamian cities were the temples, which sat on top of ziggurats. Buttresses were often symbolical/decorative rather than functional. The greek term for the wall that surrounds the precinct of the temple was called the Temenos, a term which is applied to Mesopotamian buildings as well. There were internal compartments inside the walls which may have been storage areas. The temple controlled land and took in inside the walls which may have been storage areas....
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2009 for the course CLAR 120 taught by Professor Haggis during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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Mesopotamia 2 - In the third millennium, well-established...

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