Mesopotamia #2

Mesopotamia#2 - Very few Mesopotamian cemeteries have been excavated Intramural burials were common This suggests the importance of the family as a

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Very few Mesopotamian cemeteries have been excavated. Intramural burials were common.  This suggests the importance of the family as a social unit.  As the temple became more important, we see a growing distinction between public and private  space.  The biggest excavated cemetery was a public cemetery in the middle of Ur, right next to the  Temenos of the temple. 4-6,000 graves were found. Some large graves were found that  suggest some sort of social differentiation. Chamber tombs were found, with pits dug next to  them. These were filled with bodies, as many as 75 in each. These are the infamous “death pits”  of Ur.  These burial sites were not monumental, no indications of markers, no obvious features.  Some graves contained war wagons buried with oxen, and the doorway was guarded by six  bodies in full battle armor. Many of these people may have died by ritual suicide. Some of those 
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2009 for the course CLAR 120 taught by Professor Haggis during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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Mesopotamia#2 - Very few Mesopotamian cemeteries have been excavated Intramural burials were common This suggests the importance of the family as a

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