Uruk and Eridu 2

Uruk and Eridu 2 - Neolithic cities lacked systems for the...

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Neolithic cities lacked systems for the distribution of food throughout the population, and they  lacked complex political structures.  Mesopotamian cities first appeared in the lower alluvium of the Tigris and Euphrates.  Pottery is one of the best tools for dating archaeological sites due to stylistic changes through  time. Sometimes, bits of stone within the clay can be used to pinpoint where the pottery came  from.  Mesopotamian cities were city-states. A city-state was a major independent city and its  surrounding regions. The bigger the city, the bigger the surrounding land holdings. As the city  grew, so did their surrounding land areas. As the cities grew, the ran up against each other, they  began to compete with each other. Salinization of the soil drove the expansion of farmland and  development of irrigation.  The constant expansion led to warfare between the city-states. Eventually, this led to large  kingdoms such as Agade (Akkad) of Sargon The Great. The Akkadian kingdom lasted for a few 
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Uruk and Eridu 2 - Neolithic cities lacked systems for the...

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