Chapter 10

Chapter 10 - Chapter 10: Tides Barycentric motion of Earth...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 10: Tides Barycentric motion of Earth and Moon. Barycentric motion of Earth and Moon. Gm 1 m 2 r 2 Gravitational Force = G = gravitational constant m = mass of objects r = radius Gravitational equation reveals 2 important things: 1) The more massive an object, the stronger its gravitational force 2) The further apart 2 objects, the lower the gravitational force; because the distance (r) variable is squared, this gravitation forces decreases exponentially with distance (i.e., the effect of distance is very strong) The further apart 2 objects, the lower the gravitational force; because the distance (r) variable is squared, this gravitation forces decreases exponentially with distance (i.e., the effect of distance is very strong) This results in oceans being pulled with most force on the side of Earth closest to moon (arrow size = force of gravitational attraction). Z = zenith; N = nadir Gravitational forces of moon on Earths surface Centripetal forces of moon on Earths surface Centripetal forces are forces that keep Earths particles in barycentric motion....
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2009 for the course GEOL 103 taught by Professor Dr.ries during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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Chapter 10 - Chapter 10: Tides Barycentric motion of Earth...

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