Chapter 13

Chapter 13 - Carribbean Sea bounded to the west by Central...

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Carribbean Sea – bounded to the west by Central America and to the east by a volcanic arc. How did this volcanic arc form? Carribbean water is generally warmer and saltier than the open ocean, because it is a restricted basin with a lot of evaporation because of high tropical temperatures.
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Salinity profiles throughout the Carribbean Sea.
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Gulf of Mexico
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Currents in the Gulf of Mexico follow a circular pattern called the Loop Current. Mostly a surface current, it brings in warm water from the Carribbean in a circular path and then exits out the Straights of Florida.
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Temperature map showing the effect of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico – this heat is imported from the Carribbean Sea.
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Gulf of California – one of the newest seas on Earth, formed approximately 6 million years ago as Baja California rifted away from Mexico.
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Bering Sea – bounded to the north by Alaska and Russia, to the south by the Aleutian Island Arc. How did this island arc form?
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Red Sea
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Red Sea – like the Gulf of California, is a very young sea that formed from continental rifting. Because its flanks are so shallow, they receive lots of light and because it is in the tropics, the water is very warm. These conditions favor coral reefs and other calcifying organisms which have formed massive reefs throughout this sea.
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Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea – northern extensions of the Indian Ocean, divided by the Indian peninsula. Circulation patterns dominated by monsoonal winds – this, as well as submarine ridges, is what isolates these seas and bays from the Indian Ocean.
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Circulation patterns
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2009 for the course GEOL 103 taught by Professor Dr.ries during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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Chapter 13 - Carribbean Sea bounded to the west by Central...

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