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Chapter 2- Water

Chapter 2- Water - Chapter 2 Water The Solvent for...

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Chapter 2 – Water: The Solvent for Biochemical Reactions 1. Water and Polarity a. When two atoms with the same electronegativity form a bond, the electrons are shared equally between the two atoms. However, if atoms with differing electronegativity form a bond, the electrons are not shared equally and more of the negative charge is found closer to one of the atoms – these are called polar bonds i. For a molecule to be polar, it must possess: 1. Polar bonds 2. Dipole moment ii. Some molecules have polar bonds but are non-polar 1. E.g. CO 2 – polar bonds, but linear molecule non-polar 2. Solvent Properties of Water a. Why do some chemicals dissolve in water while others do not? i. The polar nature of water largely determines its solvent properties 1. Ionic compounds are soluble in water a. KCl, K+, Cl- 2. Polar compounds are soluble in water a. Ethyl alcohol b. Acetone ii. The negative end of a water dipole attracts a positive ion or the positive end of a another dipole
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