Chapter 4 – The Three-Dimensional Structure of Proteins

Chapter 4 – The Three-Dimensional Structure of Proteins

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Chapter 4 – The Three-Dimensional Structure of Proteins 1. What are the levels of protein structure? a. Primary Structure i. The order in which the amino acids are covalently linked together b. Secondary Structure i. The arrangement in space of the atoms in the peptide backbone 1. α-helix 2. β-pleated sheet ii. Repetitive interactions resulting from hydrogen bonding between the amide N-H and the carbonyl groups of the peptide back bone c. Tertiary Structure i. The 3-d arrangement of all the atoms in the protein, including those in the side chains and in any prosthetic groups (groups of atoms other than amino acids) d. Quaternary Structure i. Arrangement of subunits with respect to one another 1. A protein can consist of multiple polypeptide chains called subunits 2. Secondary Structure of Proteins a. The hydrogen-bonded arrangement of the backbone of the protein, the polypeptide chain b. The combination of the planar peptide group with the two freely rotating bonds has important implications for the 3-d conformations of peptides and proteins i. Visualize it as a series of playing cards connected at opposite corners c. α-helix and β-sheet i. The α-helix and β-sheet are periodic structures; their features repeat at regular intervals
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Chapter 4 – The Three-Dimensional Structure of Proteins

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