EMUS 1832 Review Test 1

EMUS 1832 Review - EMUS 1832 Review Sheet for Test 1 Music Elements and Medieval Renaissance Baroque Music Listening Examples Anonymous Alleluia

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EMUS 1832 Review Sheet for Test 1 Listening Examples - Anonymous: Alleluia: Vidimus stellam 1. Middle Ages 450 - 1450 2. Bass and tenor 3. Anonymous 4. Free rhytm or flexible 5. Monophonic 6. Gregorian chant - Machaut: "Agnus Dei," Notre Dame Mass 1. Middle Ages 450 - 1450 2. Tenor 3. Guillaume de Machaut 4. Free rhythm 5. Polyphonic 6. Gregorian chant - Josquin: Ave Maria . . . virgo serena 1. Renaissance 1440 – 1521 2. Soprano voices and imitated by alto, tenor and bass 3. Josquin Desprez 4. Free rhythm 5. Polyphonic imitation, some homophonic 6. Gregorian chant/ secular piece - Bach, Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D Major, I 1. Baroque 1721 2. Flute, violin, harpsichord (solo group) vs. orchestra 3. Johann Sebastian Bach 4. Regular meter (allegro) 5. Polyphonic 6. Concerto grosso - Bach: Organ Fugue in G Minor (“The Little”) 1. Baroque 1709 2. Soprano, alto, tenor, bass, keyboard 3. Johann Sebastian Bach 4. Quadrupile meter 5. Polyphonic 6. Fugue
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- Purcell: “Dido’s Lament” from Dido and Aeneas 1. Baroque 1659 -1695 2. Strings, violin, cello and harpsichord, vocals 3. Henry Purcell 4. Slow three meter 5. Polyphonic 6. Recitative - Vivaldi: La Primavera , No. 1, I 1. Baroque 1678 – 1741 2. Solo violin, flute, string orchestra, and harpsichord 3. Antonio Vivaldi 4. Quadruple meter 5. Homophonic 6. Ritornello form - Handel: “Ev’ry Valley,” from The Messiah 1. Baroque 1685 – 1759 2. Sopranos, Tenors, strings, basso continuo 3. George Frederic Handel 4. Quadruple meter 5. Homophonic 6. String ritornello For each example, be able to identify the (1) time period (2) instrumentation or voices used (3) composer (4) whether the piece is in free rhythm or metered (5) texture (i.e, monophonic) (6) type of work (i.e., plainchant) Texture: monophonic - music with one melody line and no accompaniment (Gregorian chant, etc) polyphonic - music with two more more simultaneous melody lines. May or may not have accompaniment. (Renaissance music, rounds, etc) homophonic - music with one melody line and accompaniment Syncopation: Accenting of a note at an unexpected time, as between two beats or on a weak beat. Syncopation is a major characteristic of jazz. X x x x x X x x x X x x x (clave rhythm)
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Types of work (genre): Medieval Music (Middle Ages) Renaissance Music Baroque Music Classical Romantic Twentieth Century Pitch: Relative highness or lowness of a sound. Tempo: speed of the beat (measured in beats per minute) largo (40-60), grave (60-66), adagio (66-76): slow andante (76-108): moderately slow moderato (108-120): moderate pace allegretto (115-120): moderately fast allegro (120-168), vivace, presto (168-200): fast Voice types: soprano – Female voice of high range. alto – Female vice of low range.
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course EMUS 1832 taught by Professor Nunez,dani during the Winter '08 term at Colorado.

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EMUS 1832 Review - EMUS 1832 Review Sheet for Test 1 Music Elements and Medieval Renaissance Baroque Music Listening Examples Anonymous Alleluia

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