2--presentation--First Amendment

2--presentation--First Amendment - The First Amendment...

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    The First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting  an establishment of religion, or  prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or  abridging the freedom of speech, or of  the press; or the right of the people  peacefully to assemble, and to petition  the government for a redress of  grievances.
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    The First Amendment (cont.) What is protected? From whom or what are those rights  protected? Are these rights absolute?
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    Incorporation of the 1 st  A. Definition of incorporation: Incorporation is the process through  which the First Amendment came to  apply to state and local governments –  not just the federal government.
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    Gitlow v. New York (1925) This is the landmark case in which the  U.S. Supreme Court incorporated the  First Amendment.
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    Gitlow v. New York (cont.) Gitlow was arrested for violating the  N.Y. criminal anarchy statute.  Criminal  anarchy is the crime of advocating the  violent overthrow of the government. Gitlow was a Socialist who published  newspapers that advocated mass  workers’ strikes and a people’s revolt  against the government.
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    Gitlow v. New York (cont.) The Court incorporated the 1 st  A. by  combining it with the 14 th  A. due  process clause.  That clause says  no  state shall “deprive a person of life,  liberty or property without due  process of law.”
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    Gitlow v. New York (1925) The Court interpreted the word “liberty”  in the 14 th  A. as including the rights  protected by the 1 st  A.
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    Gitlow v. New York (cont.) Poor Mr. Gitlow still lost his case,  however.  Exercising judicial restraint, 
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2009 for the course JOMC 340 taught by Professor Hofedges during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

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2--presentation--First Amendment - The First Amendment...

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