Broadcasting_PP_slides

Broadcasting_PP_slides - FCC Created by the Communications...

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FCC Created by the Communications Act of 1934 Instructed to regulate broadcasting in the “public interest, convenience or necessity” Creates administrative law
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Types of FCC regulations Technical Ownership Content
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Cable television Regulated by a mix of federal agency rules, federal statutes, court-made law and local franchises. Cable companies are not licensed by the FCC. A franchise is a contract between a cable company and the government of the community it serves.
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30 years of deregulation This is due to the view that there is sufficient competition in the electronic marketplace of ideas (no scarcity) that government regulations are not needed to make broadcasters serve the public interest. Competition will do the job.
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Example of deregulation Into the 1970’s, one company could own only 7 tv stations, 7 am radio stations and 7 fm radio stations. That was the 7-7-7 rule.
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Example (cont.) Now there is no limit on the total number of Now there is no limit on the total number of TV stations one company may own. TV stations one company may own. However, the total national audience reach However, the total national audience reach cannot exceed 39%. cannot exceed 39%. Also, there is no limit on the total number of Also, there is no limit on the total number of radio stations one company can own. radio stations one company can own. There are complicated rules about how many There are complicated rules about how many media outlets one company can own in one media outlets one company can own in one market. They depend on how many media market. They depend on how many media outlets are in the market. outlets are in the market.
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FCC licenses They last for 8 years and are routinely renewed. It’s illegal to broadcast without one. To get one, one must be a U.S. citizen and meet other financial and technical criteria. They can be revoked. Licenses are no longer free. They are auctioned to the highest bidder.
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FCC content regulations-1 Reasonable access rule requires broadcasters (but not cable) to allow reasonable access to the air for candidates for federal office. Not for state or local offices.
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FCC content regulations-2 Equal opportunities rule requires broadcasters and cable stations that chose to provide time to one legally
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2009 for the course JOMC 340 taught by Professor Hofedges during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

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Broadcasting_PP_slides - FCC Created by the Communications...

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