PovertySummary

PovertySummary - Poverty in America According to Mollie...

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Poverty in America According to Mollie Orshansky, who developed the poverty measurements used by the U.S. government, "to be poor is to be deprived of those goods and services and pleasures which others around us take for granted." Since 1965, there have been two slightly different versions of the federal poverty measure, the poverty thresholds and poverty guidelines. When using the threshold approach, income is used to determine your poverty level. If the family income is less than the appropriate threshold, then the family and all of its members are considered in poverty. The Census Bureau updates the poverty thresholds annually for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U). The poverty thresholds are mainly used for statistical purposes or, in other words, to estimate the number of Americans in poverty. The poverty guidelines, on the other hand, are used for administrative purposes. For instance, government aid programs use the poverty guidelines to determine a family’s financial eligibility for certain federal programs. The causes of poverty are many; however there are four reasons which are the most important. They are economics, natural disasters, social factors and limited job opportunities. The causes of poverty have changed throughout the years and will continue
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2009 for the course WRIT 340 taught by Professor 11:00-12:20pm during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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PovertySummary - Poverty in America According to Mollie...

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