chapter 17 -- bacterial viruses

chapter 17 -- bacterial viruses - Chapter 17: Bacterial...

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Chapter 17: Bacterial Viruses
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Bacteriophages Viruses that infect bacteria Also called phage for short Either kill or slow the growth of their host cells Classified by morphology & nucleic acid properties Examples: MS2 RNA phage φX174 SSDNA phage M13 SSDNA phage
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Steps in Bacteriophage Multiplication 1. Adsorption (or attachment) Virus binds to receptors on host cell via spikes or peplomers Major basis for host specificity Host cell receptors include flagella, pili and lipopolysaccharides 2. Penetration Bacteriophage contains lysozyme-like enzymes which aids in creating a hole in the host cell wall Enzyme varies with specific virus (i.e. g5 protein T-even phages) Phage injects its nucleic acid inside, leaving rest of structure outside of bacterial cell- this is different from eukaryotic viruses: Enveloped animal viruses enter as via endocytosis or membrane fusion while naked animal viruses enter by endocytosis Plant viruses need enter through wounds and damaged cell walls Intracellular state begins Phage DNA is now vulnerable to restriction endonucleases of host cell May also carry nucleases of its own to degrade host chromosome
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Phage Adsorption & Penetration
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Steps in Bacteriophage Multiplication 3. Replication Copy and express viral genes by host machinery and replicate viral genomes Early proteins are transcribed and translated Occurs before viral nucleic acids are replicated
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2009 for the course MIBO 3500 taught by Professor Dustman during the Fall '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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chapter 17 -- bacterial viruses - Chapter 17: Bacterial...

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