cronon.complete guide to Changes in the Land

cronon.complete guide to Changes in the Land - Reading...

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Reading prompts William Cronin, Changes in the Land 1. What is the “myth of a Golden Age” that Thoreau’s writing exemplifies? How does this affect perceptions of Indian ways of relating to the land? (pp4, 12) 2. How does the way that colonist describe changes in the land parallel ideas of human change? (5, 6) 3. What are some of the various methods Cronin has drawn from to construct what he calls, an “ecological history”? What evidence do they provide? (6-7) 4. How is an ecological history approach Different from the ecosystem approach? 5. What are some of the problems with reconstructing the past? (8-10) 6. What is “functionalism”? 10 7. What is an “ecosystem” approach? 11, 12, 13, 14 8. What are the “assumptions” of an ecological history? 13 9. How were the colonialists perception of the New World “relative”? What did they see when they described New England? 10. How did settler accounts of the New World reflect values of the Europeans settlers? with what language did they describe the land? why? 11. How did the settlers accounts effect the data available for an historical ecology? 12. Other terms [super-organism, homeostasis, succession, vegetational zones, functionalism,
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This note was uploaded on 03/24/2009 for the course ANTH 101 taught by Professor Scarre during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

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cronon.complete guide to Changes in the Land - Reading...

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