Fall 2016 Syllabus Introduction to the Old Testament Hebrew Bible

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Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/OldTestamentONLINE CLASS SYLLABUSPAR 235-008Department of Philosophy and ReligionUNC WilmingtonFall 2016Dr. Theodore W. BurghPhone: 910-962-7660[email protected]Bear HallOffice: 275Bear HallOffice Hours T & TH 11:00-12:00 PM; by appointmentIMPORTANT NOTES!**Please note that if there are changes with the syllabus during the semester I willpost them on the online syllabus and do my best to post them in an announcement,email, etc.Understand that you are responsible for keeping up with the onlinesyllabus and any new material, assignments, deadlines, etc.For example, pleasecheck the Discussion Board for topics select topics explored in some modules.Also,be sure to keep up with checking your email, as the instructor may communicateinformation in this manner.This is aPAR Basic Studies Course, which explores a range of issues and inquiriesrelated to the Bible regarding its nature, origin, composition, history, culture, setting,people, and their stories, and its teachings. Students analyze and analyzeapproaches to interpreting the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, how it impacts people’slives, how the study of the text developed, and the reasons for its enduring presence.Students will examine the range of literary genre, symbolic metaphors, figures ofspeech and religious and theological themes.Course DescriptionThe Bible permeates nearly every aspect of Western culture. Legal systems, politics,moral issues, and philosophy are some of the areas in which this text has andcontinues to influence. No book in the history of human civilization has functioned insuch a unique and powerful way in western culture. For this reason, the study of theBible as a document is essential in the study of the American culture.Course ObjectivesBy the end of the course, you will:1) gain knowledge about the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and its formationand history, from an interdisciplinary perspective, which includesgeography, history, archaeology, language, literature, and religious studies;2) understand the literary genre and the phenomenal survival of the HB/OT asa religious text or scripture and an important collection of literary worksworthy of study in the University curriculum irrespective of one’s religious1
faith or confession;3) gain an overview of the history, cultures, and peoples mentioned in theHB/OT; what might be learned from the Hebrews’ ideas of the sacred andthe secular, ancient peoples’ communities, law and morality, pain andsuffering, war and peace, honesty and deception, gender and sexuality, andbetter understand how family dynamics are approached in the biblical text.Required Texts-Matthews, V., and Moyer, J.2005The Old Testament: Text and Context. 2nd Edition. Peabody: HendricksonPublishers, Inc.

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Term
Fall
Professor
Staff
Tags
bible, Tanakh

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