Chapter 3 - Paradigms and Communication Theory - Final

Chapter 3 - Paradigms and Communication Theory - Final -...

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Chapter 3: Paradigms and Communication Theory Michael deGroot Comm. as Social Science Lecture Notes Chapter 3: Paradigms and Communication Theory 1. Scientific Scholarship 1. Studies the Physical World 2. Stresses objectivity 1. Objective A state of being objective; that is, not influenced by personal feelings, interpretations, or prejudice which allows unbiased research based on facts. 1. Ex . Photo shows a scene for what it is - objectivity 3. Objectivity allows the discovery of reality (Big T) 1. No researcher will accept a subjective study, so science primarily value objectivity, 1. Ex. Debate over if smoking causes cancer? 1. Some scientist citied evidence that it caused cancer 2. Other science, who worked for cigarette subjects and who conducted bias research, claimed smoking didn’t cause cancer 1. We have correlation, not causation 2. When scientists have bias, we reject the information. 1
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Chapter 3: Paradigms and Communication Theory 2. How objective is science? 1. Science is objective in that: 1. All scientist use Scientific Method – operationalizing, hypothesiszing, experimenting etc. 1. The subject matters differs but the methods remain same. 1. If you refuse scientific method, you can’t be a scienctist. 2. Science is not objective in that scientist subjectively determine. 1. What they will study 1. If science completely was entirely objective, everyone would study the same subject, not true. 2. How they will use it 1. Or how they will conduct the study. 3. What data they will gather 4. What the data means/how to interpretthe results. 3. Examples of Scientific Scholarship 1. Research in physics chemistry, biology, genetics, etc. 2
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Chapter 3: Paradigms and Communication Theory 4. Humanistic Scholarship (Artist Historicans and History Scholars) 1. Expresses artistic, cultural, moral and philosophical views 2. Stresses the important of subjectivity when creating novels, poems, or paintings 1. Expresses personal experience, emotion, or interpretation 2. Not concerned with the objectivity and Big T 3. Rhetorical theory reflects humanistic scholarship. 1. Engage in critical research but do not measure cause and or effect, but they do analyze communication behavior, giving their own interpretation of reality through creative insights and new ideas that enrich everyone. 2. Hard scientists, individuals using the scientific method, should not claim soft science is less important. 5. Social-Science Scholarship 1. What do the Social Scientist study? 1. Human Social Behavior 2. What is Social Science a Blend of? 1. Science and humanities 1. What aspects are scientific? 1. Cause effect explanation and the scientific method. 3
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Chapter 3: Paradigms and Communication Theory 3. How does Social Science relate to Science? 1.
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Chapter 3 - Paradigms and Communication Theory - Final -...

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