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2-21 - ‘J Chapter 2 At your arms reach station there...

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Unformatted text preview: ‘J. Chapter 2 At your arms reach station there should be some precut pieces of transparent graph paper. Take one and use your permanent marker to label some of the lines along the x-axis (e.g., 5, 10, etc.). (This will make it easier to quickly determine the location or a particular line.) Then tape this scale onto the box in the "shuttered" opening of your spectroscope. If you have done it correctly, then when the shutter is part way open you should be able to View the fluorescent light spectrum, and also read your x-axis labels. When you have your graph paper positioned properly then you should mark its exact location in some fashion. That way, if it accidentally gets moved (or, if you want to take it off for any reason) then you can replace it without messing up your calibration. Now narrow the slit to about 0.5 mm and point your spectroscope directly up at the brightest part of a fluorescent light. It helps if you shut one eye! The spectrum that you can see is actually composed of two types of spectra: a continuous and a line emission spectrum, superimposed on each other. This superimposition produces a rainbow with 3 fairly prominent lines of light in it. Slit 1 2 3 Violet Green Yellow View of Spectrum Inside Box The 3 prominent lines are superimposed on a continuous emission spectrum The three lines 1. 2, and 3, are violet, green, and yellow and are the strong emissions from Hg vapor in the fluorescent tube. These lines have well- known wavelengths and we can use them to calibrate the spectroscope: Line 1, violet 436 urn - Line 2, green 546 um Line 3, yellow 580 nm Take another piece of black tape and place it at the bottom of the slit to adjust the slit length so that the bottom of the emission lines falls exactly on the bottom line of your graph paper. 2-2 1 ...
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