Sociology Review

Sociology Review - Sociology Review for Exam 1 The test is...

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Sociology Review for Exam 1 The test is derived from material in the book, class lecture, and the powerpoint. The review guide is meant to be helpful to you in pulling out things that will be on the exam. I would wager that 95% or more of the questions on the exam are reflected in this review sheet. I would go through it and make sure you can 1. give a definition for all the terms and 2. know all of the information from the readings I suggest is important. Remember that you will have questions that require you to recognize which theory is being applied based on short stories. Terms Norms – behavioral codes or prescriptions that guide people into actions and self- presentations conforming to social acceptablity Socialization – the process by which people develop their human capacities and acquire a unique personality and identity and by which culture is passed from generation to generation. Nature – refers to the human genetic makeup of biological inheritance. Nurture – refers to the enviroment or interactions experiences that make up every individual’s life. Sumner’s three categories of norms Folkways customary way of doing things that apply to the details of life our routine matters. Basically, customs, traditions, and etiquette. Violating folkways doesn’t result in serious outrage or punishment. Mores norms that people define as essential to the well-being of their group or nation. The violation of mores results in serious social condemnation. Examples would be child molestation or murder. Laws – norms that are supported by formal sanctions. People who violate laws may be fined or arrested. Some are more serious than others. Murder vs. traffic violation. Achieved characteristic – an attribute acquired through some combination of chioce, effort, and ability. Ex. Playing the violin
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Ascribed characteristic – (1) any physical trait that’s biological in origin and/or cannot be changed but to which people assign overwhelming significance. (2) an attribute that people have at birth, develop over time, or posses through no effort or fault of their own. Ex. Biological sex. Functionalism – sees society as an organism C. Wright Mill’s Sociological Imagination - the ability to connect seemingly impersonal and remote historical forces to the most basic incidents of an individual’s life. Troubles - are personal needs, problems, or difficulties that can be explained in terms of individual shortcomings related to motivation attitude, ability, character, or judgement. Issues – are explained in terms of individual shortcomings related to motivation attitude, ability, character, or judgement. are explained only by factors outside an individual’s control and immediate enviroment. Epistemology – One’s philosophical approach to research Standpoint epistemology – people approach research from different past experiences.
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2009 for the course SOC 206 taught by Professor Brauer during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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Sociology Review - Sociology Review for Exam 1 The test is...

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