Lec11_SPM_CU - Scanned Probe Microscopy Christopher Kit...

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1 Christopher ‘Kit’ Umbach Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering Research Interests Scanned probe techniques STM, AFM, NSOM, Combined AFM/fluorescence, Tip-enhanced Morphology of glass surfaces Nanoporous metals Manager of NBTC AFM facility and CCMR Molecular and Cellular Surface Imaging (MOCSI) facility Scanned Probe Microscopy Capability: Revolutionary Tool SPM makes nanoscale characterization commonplace SPM’s are ubiquitous at Cornell •>15 instruments in individual research labs Wide range of commercial instruments (not an exclusive list!) Digital Instruments (Veeco Metrology) (www.di.com) •RHK (www.rhk-tech.com) •Omicron (www.omicron-instruments.com) •JEOL (www.jeol.com) •Molecular Imaging (Agilent) (www.molec.com) Ease of use Graduate students trained within two hours •10 minutes from sample loading to imaging Cost of entry low (compared to SEM or TEM) $35K for simplest instrument •$500K for ultra-high vacuum system
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2 Capability: Specifications Features Common between STM and AFM: •Scan range: 200 x 200 micron lateral, 10 to 70 micron vertical •Image in air, fluids, inert gas, vacuum •Some vibration isolation required •Scan rates: 10 nm/sec to 1000 nm/sec typical 512x512 pixels at 512 pixels/sec Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) Conductive samples (sustain ~50 pA at ~1 V) •Lateral resolution (tip dependent): as small as ~0.1 nm •Vertical resolution: ~0.01 nm Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) •Insulating, conductive, magnetic samples •Up to 200 mm diameter samples, 12 mm thick (for commercial instruments with lower vertical resolution) •Lateral resolution (tip dependent):typically ~10 nm •Vertical resolution: typically 0.03 nm Capability:Pick Your Acronym Operating Modes of DI Dimension 3100 SPM: Contact Mode TappingMode TM Non-contact Mode LiftMode™ PhaseImaging™ Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM) Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) Force Modulation Electric Force Microscopy (EFM) Surface Potential Microscopy (SPoM) Scanning Capacitance Microscopy (SCM) Scanning Spreading Resistance Microscopy (SSRM) Tunneling Atomic Force Microscopy Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) Nanoindenting Topography Metrology Mechanical properties Hardness Elastic modulus Spatial variations in modulus Electrical properties Spatially resolved I-V curves and surface potential Magnetic heterogeneities No elemental identification DI DI
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3 Instrumentation Technology Basic Instrumentation Vibration Isolation •Internal spring systems •Rigid, compact design •External air bearings Nanometer Scanner •Piezoceramic tubes, rods •Hysteresis, creep unavoidable Sample Approach Nanometer steps over mm distances! •Lead screws
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2009 for the course A&EP 470 taught by Professor Lindau during the Fall '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lec11_SPM_CU - Scanned Probe Microscopy Christopher Kit...

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