Case_Study__1_Non_Dimensional_Analysis

Case_Study__1_Non_Dimensional_Analysis - BEE 331 Bio-Fluid...

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BEE 331 Bio-Fluid Mechanics Case Study #1: Dimensional Analysis Analyzing a Coronary Artery Background Dimensional-analysis is a powerful tool for defining relationship between parameters of a system. In addition, it can be used to relate parameters of geometrically and dynamically similar systems. In this study, dimensional analysis will be used to analyze an enlarged model of the coronary artery, a vessel used to supply blood to the heart. Quantified trends will then be related to the actual vessel in order to assess both a normal and stenosed coronary artery. (A stenosed artery means that the artery contains a stenosis – an abnormal narrowing, usually caused by disease). The Setup A laboratory model of steady flow in the coronary artery is being developed. The working fluid in the system is a glycerol-water mixture that has the same physical properties as blood, a density of 1060 kg/m 3 , and a viscosity of 0.004 N·s/m 2 . The experimental setup is shown below. A motorized pump draws fluid from a storage tank and forces it to travel in a closed loop. A short region of plastic tubing (shaded in the diagram) serves as the coronary model. The pressure drop over this region is measured by a manometer and the flow rate is measured by a Venturi meter downstream. The flow rate can be adjusted by means of a flow valve control located just beyond the pump. Assume the flow valve control is at a constant setting unless otherwise noted. The
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Case_Study__1_Non_Dimensional_Analysis - BEE 331 Bio-Fluid...

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