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Lect_W2_151-2 WESO (short)

Lect_W2_151-2 WESO (short) - General Chemistry CHEM 151...

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UA GenChem General Chemistry General Chemistry CHEM 151 CHEM 151 Week 2
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UA GenChem Week 2 Reading Assignment Week 2 Section 5.8 Kinetic Molecular theory : a Model for Gases 5.9 Mean FreePath Tools of Chemistry – equations and graphs for gases Section 5.1 pressure and Units 5.2 Pressureand Collisions 5.3 Simple gas laws –Charles, Boyle, Avogadro Work answered end-of-chapter problems as needed (YOU decided whereyou are and whereyou need to be.)
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UA GenChem Analysis What is this? Modeling How do I explain it? Synthesis How do I make it? Three central goals Why do substances undergo phase transitions with changing temperature or pressure? How do weMODEL thesesystems to Explain/Predict their behavior? Modeling Macroscopic Microscopic or Particulate Symbolic NaCl Three different perspectives
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UA GenChem Macro vs Micro Macroscopic Description Wemeasureproperties: Temperature( T ) Pressure ( P ) Volume( V ) Microscopic Description We model systems as composed by particles: Number ( N ) Mass ( m ) Speed ( v ) Kinetic Energy ( KE ) Potential Energy ( PE ) Thechallenge: Usemicroscopic descriptions to explain macroscopic behavior
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UA GenChem Solid Liquid Gas 1 mL of Water = 33444444444444444444444 molecules A Particulate Model of Matter Basic Assumptions : Particles could represent anything wewant: atoms, molecules, ions. Note : Theserepresentations are static , have unrealistic proportions , represent particles as solid objects . 1. Any macroscopic sample of a substanceis composed of a large number of particles ; Size~ 0.000000001 m = 1 x 10 -9 m = 1 nm(1 nanometer)
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UA GenChem A ParticulateModel of Matter Basic Assumptions: 2. Particles are constantly moving (translation, rotation, vibration); How do we explain pressure ” in microscopic terms? Pressure = Collision force/area of wall (intensive) Depends on: Volume , particle speed , number of particles
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UA GenChem BROWNIAN MOTION Pollen in oil under A microscope
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UA GenChem Let’s look at a particle simulator Google
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