Chem 114A 2009 lecture 4 AS GIVEN 011509

Chem 114A 2009 lecture 4 AS GIVEN 011509 - Chem 114A DNA...

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Chem 114A DNA Lecture 4 January 15, 2009 (Thursday) 1
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2 If you are unable to see the handwritten annotations on the pdf slides at WebCT, try downloading the latest version of Adobe Reader. If that doesn’t work, go to the ACT helpdesk. To listen to the podcasts of the lectures, go to: http://podcast.ucsd.edu
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3 correction
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The pKa of an acid is the pH at which it is half- dissociated. The “a” stands for apparent because in biochemistry generally use measured values that depend on some standard conditions. pKa is also the midpoint of a titration curve. 4 Review
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Titration curves. 5 Review
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Henderson-Hasselbach equation. 6 Review
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Bond energies. 7 Review
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NaCl in water provides examples of ion-dipole forces. 8 Review
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van der Waals interactions: attractive or repulsive forces not involving charges (electrostatics). Permanent dipole- permanent dipole Permanent dipole- induced dipole Instantaneous induced dipole-induced dipole (London dispersion) 9 Review
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10 Review
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α -helix in proteins. 11 Review
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Double helix in DNA. 12 Review
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Hydrophobic interactions. 13 Review
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Membrane bilayer. 14 Review
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“DNA, you know, is Midas’ gold. Everybody who touches it goes mad.” (M. Wilkins) 15
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the development of organisms. Complete living organisms are not preformed inside eggs. (This was believed at one time.) Proteins are responsible for structure and function of organisms. Organisms develop as embryos.
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2009 for the course CHEM 641999 taught by Professor Opella during the Spring '09 term at UCSD.

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Chem 114A 2009 lecture 4 AS GIVEN 011509 - Chem 114A DNA...

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