LECTURE-8 _The Cytoskeleton

LECTURE-8 _The Cytoskeleton - The Cytoskeleton Lecture 9...

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The Cytoskeleton Lecture # 9 Campbell and Reece (7th edition) Chapter 6; pp 112 - 118
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Lecture 10-Objectives Recall the names, structural features and  various functions of the filaments that  comprise the cytoskeleton.  Actin filaments Intermediate filaments Microtubules And compare and contrast the role of  phosphate bond energy (ATP or GTP) in  the polymerization of these three filaments. 
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Lecture 10-Objectives Recall the functions of  α -actinin and filamin. Recall the functions of kinesin and dynein. Describe the extracellular matrix (ECM)  Name three intercellular junctions and  compare and contrast their functions.
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The Cytoskeleton What is the cytoskeleton? It is often considered an organelle. It is a network of fibers extending throughout  the cytoplasm. The cytoskeleton is dynamic. It organizes cell structures. It supports and strengthens cell morphology.
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The Cytoskeleton The cytoskeleton comprises three distinct fibrous  networks each composed of different proteins. The microfilaments (actin). The intermediate filaments (a large class of  structural proteins belonging to a super gene  family). The microtubules ( α -tubulin and  β -tubulin dimers). 
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3 Networks Comprise the Cytoskeleton Filament Size Protein  Composition Microfilaments 4-6 nm Actin Intermediate  Filaments 7-11nm Diverse Microtubules 20-26 nm Tubulin ( α β )
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Microfilaments Actin Two intertwined strands • maintain cell shape by resisting tension (pull) Actin subunit Protein subunits Structure Functions • motility via pseudopodia (see Chapter 27) • muscle contraction (see Chapter 43) • cell division in animals (see Chapter 8) 7 nm Intermediate filaments Keratin, vimentin, lamin, others Fibers wound into thicker cables • maintain cell shape by resisting tension (pull) • anchor nucleus and some other organelles Microtubules α -tubulin and β - tubulin dimers Hollow tube Keratin subunits Tubulin dimer • maintain cell shape by resisting compression (push) • motility via flagella or cilia • move chromosomes during cell division (see Chapter 9) • move organelles 10 nm 25 nm The Cytoskeleton  
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The structure and function of the cytoskeleton
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How did actin get its name?
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