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LECTURE-9 _Membrane Structure and Function

LECTURE-9 _Membrane Structure and Function - Lecture 11...

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Lecture # 11 MEMBRANE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION Campbell and Reece (7 th  edition) Chapter 7 Pages 124- 140 Part 1:  The structure of membranes Part 2:  Transport through membranes
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Lecture 11-Objectives Describe a typical plasma membrane. Define an give examples of an amphipathic   molecule. Name and recognize the structures of several  phospholipids. Discuss the functions of membrane proteins Discuss how unsaturated fatty acids affects the  melting point and fluidity of membranes.  Know what these words mean:  hypertonic . Hypotonic , and isotonic  solutions.  
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Lecture 11-Objectives Define and give examples of: Passive transport Active transport Osmosis Facilitated diffusion Cotransport Know the differences between exocytosis and  endocytosis. Describe and give examples of phagocytosis,  pinocytosis, and receptor-mediated endocytosis.
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The Plasma Membrane -1 The Plasma Membrane is the membrane that  surrounds the living cell. It separates the living cell from its  surroundings. It is selectively permeable. Some substances pass through the  membrane more easily than others.
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The Plasma Membrane -2 The Plasma Membrane is composed of  phospholipids and proteins which often  contain carbohydrate. Proteins containing carbohydrate are  called glycoproteins. The molecules of the plasma membrane are  often amphipathic .
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The Plasma Membrane -3 Amphipathic molecules have both  hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. Phospholipids and membrane proteins are  amphipathic molecules.
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Review- Phospholipid Structure X = Many types of polar molecules. Hydrophilic region of the molecule. R = Fatty acids, saturated and unsaturated. hydrophobic region of the molecule.
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Many phospholipids have unsaturated  fatty acids, double bonds which causes a kink in the molecule. The “kink” reduces the “packing” of the  lipid bilayer.  Thus the membrane is  less ridged.
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  Artificial membranes (cross sections) Hydrophobic bonding (interactions) stabilize  the lipid bilayer.
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Two generations of membrane models
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 Freeze-fracture and freeze-etch Freeze-fracture  experiments show  that the proteins  transverse the lipid  bilayer.
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Two generations of membrane models Membrane proteins are  amphipathic and transverse  the lipid bilayer.
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