LECTURE-17_Cell Communication 1 and 2

LECTURE-17_Cell Communication 1 and 2 - Cell Communication...

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Lecture #17   Cell Communication Campbell: Chapter 11, pages 201-217.
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OBJECTIVES Recall the biological rationalization for cell signaling. Define signal transduction. Recount the general scheme of signal transduction and what is achieved from the process. Compare and contrast the mechanism for hydrophobic and hydrophilic signal transduction.
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OBJECTIVES Recognize their features and give examples of: Contact–dependent signaling Paracrine signaling Synaptic signaling Endocrine signaling Autocrine signaling Recall how different cells can respond differently to the same extracellular signal molecule. Describe the three Stages of Cell Signaling.
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OBJECTIVES Recognize, describe, and give examples of: 1. G-protein-linked receptors 2. Tyrosine-kinase receptors 3. Ion-channel receptors Describe how a steroid hormone acts as a cell signaling molecule.
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OBJECTIVES Describe the role of phosphorylation in signal transduction pathways. Distinguish between the roles of a kinase and a phosphatase in signal transduction pathways. Recount the role, and give examples of 2nd messengers in signal transduction pathways. Define the term “transcription factor” Know several examples of hormones and describe how they act.
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NOTE! Protozoa (e.g. amoeba, paramecium) are  autonomous. During the evolution of multicellular organisms, cellular  specialization emerged at the expense of cellular  autonomy. In a complex multicellular organism not every cell is in  contact with the outside environment. Stomach epithelial cells do not recognize candy  machines.  The evolution of multicellular organisms necessitated  cellular specialization and cellular signaling. 
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  Cell Communication The viability of multicellular organisms depends on  elaborate mechanisms of intercellular communication. These communication mechanisms depend on  extracellular signal molecules, which are produced by  cells to signal neighbors or cells further away. There also must be a mechanism for cells to respond  to signals. 
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AIM To learn about the types of intercellular signals that  have evolved and that allow cells to communicate. To learn about the mechanisms by which cells  respond to a signal and the ways in which the  information from the signal is dispersed throughout the  cell. This process is called  signal  transduction .
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Signal transduction - relaying of a signal by conversion from one physical or chemical form to another. In cell biology, the process by which a cell converts an
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LECTURE-17_Cell Communication 1 and 2 - Cell Communication...

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