5._Primate_Adaptations

5._Primate_Adaptations - Primate Fossils Purpose of...

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Primate Fossils Purpose of studying prehistoric primates Useful for interpreting evolution of primate line Better understanding of the forces of evolution Fuller knowledge of the evolutionary process producing tool makers and thinkers Surprising number of fossils exist Remains usually jaws and teeth
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Primate Adaptations Look at living to help with fossils: Functional systems 1. Locomotive 2. Feeding 3. Information/brains 4. Social behavior
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LOCOMOTION Kinds 1. Bipedal = using two limbs for support 2. Quadrupedal = Using all four limbs to support the body during locomotion 3. Brachiation = hanging by the hands and support is alternated from one limb to the other; arm swinging 4. Vertical clinging and leaping =
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Quadrupedal locomotion Most nonhuman primates utilize this form of locomotion
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Vertical clinging and leaping Body oriented in upright position Preadapted for bipedalism
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Arm swinging Using only the forelimbs for locomotion Useful for feeding out at branch tips Preadapted for bipedalism
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Bipedal locomotion Humans are only primate to habitually use this form of locomotion
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Comparisons Length and orientation of muscles different for quadrupedal and bipedal primates
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Comparisons Angle of femur is different Foot is positioned differently Pelvis shaped differently
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2009 for the course BAA 1219 taught by Professor Glander during the Fall '08 term at Duke.

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5._Primate_Adaptations - Primate Fossils Purpose of...

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