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FA2008 - BILD 3 - Lecture 10 (Community Ecology - 01)

FA2008 - BILD 3 - Lecture 10 (Community Ecology - 01) -...

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11/6/08 1 Lecture 10 Community Ecology Reading Ch 54 Overview - Community Ecology I. Community definitions and concepts II. Interspecific interactions III. Species Diversity IV. Trophic Structure V. Top-down and Bottom-up control VI. Disturbance VII. Patterns of species diversity A. location (age, climate) B. size I. COMMUNITY DEFINITIONS AND CONCEPTS A biological community is an assemblage of interacting species I. COMMUNITY DEFINITIONS AND CONCEPTS Community structure - How many species are there? Which species? Which species are common, rare? How are communities structured? Two different views on community structure emerged among ecologists in the 1920s and 1930s 1. Integrated hypothesis (Clements) A community is an assemblage of closely linked species, locked into association by mandatory biotic interactions Frederic Clements 1874 - 1945
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11/6/08 2 Henry Gleason 1882 - 1972 2. Individualistic hypothesis (Gleason) Communities are loosely organized associations of independently distributed species with the same abiotic requirements Predictions - The integrated hypothesis (Clements) If the presence or absence of particular species depends on the presence or absence of other species Prediction - sharp transition between distinct communities with little overlap in the species present in alternative communities Population
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