psychia - Introduction The aim of this study is to...

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Introduction The aim of this study is to replicate Herman Ebbinghaus’ initial experiment in order to discover the amount of time required to recall different sets of nonsense syllables. When Ebbinghaus first designed this experiment, he used nonsense syllables to avoid any external stimuli (personal recognition, belief, knowledge of, etc.). It is believed that the usage of nonsense syllables increased the accuracy of the experiment, and was therefore continued in the replication. In this replication, the target population was students aged fourteen to eighteen. The students were selected at random from Jefferson County International Baccalaureate School (chosen due to its proximity to the experimenters). In addition, the students volunteered to participate in the study. No distinction was made based on sex, race, or creed when compiling the subjects. In the experiment, the subjects were given ten, twenty, and thirty seconds to memorize and study different lists of nonsense syllables (Set A for ten seconds, Set B for twenty seconds, and Set C for thirty seconds). A nonsense syllable is a consonant - vowel -consonant combination, where the consonant does not repeat, and the syllable does not have any prior meaning. At the end of each period of memorization, the subjects were given thirty seconds to write down as many of the nonsense syllables as they could remember. The average number of nonsense syllables correctly remembered for Set A, Set B, and Set C were, respectively, 3.80, 3.80, and 4.34. The results showed an increase in the average number of nonsense syllables correctly remembered as more time to study and memorize the sets was given. Method Design: Independent Variable: Amount of time given to the subjects to remember each set of syllables (Set A, Set B, and Set C) Dependent Variable: Number of correct responses given by the subjects
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Controls: Set A, Set B, and Set C contained the same nonsense syllables for each subject, amount of time given to record responses, same number of syllables on Set A, Set B, and Set C, setting the test was administered (roughly 7:30 a.m. in a classroom).
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