Week 4 - Week 4: I mmigrants-LaViest Chapter 4 | L a t i no...

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Unformatted text preview: Week 4: I mmigrants-LaViest Chapter 4 | L a t i no Out look | Good Health, Uncerta i n Prognosis Hispanics o Characteristic: heterogeneity (salient) defines Hispanic populations of the U.S. Native born, migrant, and immigrant peoples with distinctive national origins and regional settlement patterns o Multigenerational migratory and social adjustment process has produced important cultural variations within and among the respective Hispanic ethnic groups. o health and disease experience of Hispanics shaped by historical demographic sociocultural Are Hispanics a super-healthy population with differing health promotion and services needs? o Demographic composition of Hispanic ethnic groups Sociodemographic differences Mexican-origin 64% o Youngest, lowest education and income levels o ~44% of them have completed high school o ~70% earn below the poverty level Cuban-origin o 14% are 65 yrs old or older Female-headed households 38.9% Puerto Rican (2 nd ) 19.6% Mexican (Largest families) 18.9% Cuban (smalles) Unemployment among Hispanics is geneally 40-60% higher than among white non-Hispanics and somewhat lower overall than among African Americans Concentrated in lower status occupations such as service workers/laborer Whether at this historical juncture, sufficient opportunity for social and economic mobility will be available to offset Hispanic population growth, and whether Hispanic cultural strengths can operate to mitigate the negative impact of structural factors on health and on the environments where Hispanics must live. o Mortality and Morbidity Indicators of Hispanic Populations Data on Hispanics as an aggregate group do not represent anaccurate picture of the health status of all Hispanic ethnic groups and loose generalizations can lead to errorneous conclusions and faulty public health strategies Data shows that Hispanic health status is as good or better than that of white non-Hispanics Puerto Ricans have more of a jeopardized health situation than Mexican Americans Mexican Americans have a more jeopardized health situation than Cuban Americans o Limitations of Existing Data Lack of baseline data? No appropriate and accurate data on Hispanic ethnicity 1990 mortality data are based on Hispanic-origin populations from forty-six states and the District of Columbia, but exclude exclude Hispanics from NYC (does not seriously affect datas coverage) because more than 10% of death certificates had inadequate data for ethnicity. Underrepresentation of an ethnicity can lead to underestimation of specific causes of death found in an ethnic population. Do not sample sufficiently large numbers of Hispanics Fail to tabulate and report data separately for Hipsanics Only absolute numbers of deaths and the ranking of the causes of death. No cause-specific death rates for Hispanic subgroups since 1979-1981. 1987-1989 gave calculations for selected causes of death 1979-1981....
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Week 4 - Week 4: I mmigrants-LaViest Chapter 4 | L a t i no...

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