08 - What were you doing at 5:30 am this morning Recorded at Purdue Seismic Station Earthquake 5.2 5.4 magnitude 5 km deep(3.1 miles felt over 500

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1 Earthquake! What were you doing at 5:30 am this morning? 5.2 – 5.4 magnitude 5 km deep (3.1 miles) felt over 500 km away ~250 km from Purdue “New Madrid” intra-continental fault zone Earthquakes of this size occur in this area about every decade or two… Earthquake epicenters since 1800 Recorded at Purdue Seismic Station Oceanic remote sensing Oceanic remote sensing Multi-level technology This Landsat image depicts Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the Northwest Hawaiian islands. This atoll is part of the Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve. Landsat Bora-Bora IKONOS commercial satellite (Space Imaging) which can collect very high resolution images (1-4 m/pixel or less…)
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2 GOES 12, April 15, updated every 6 hours GOES GOES Project Science SeaWiFS Instrument on OrbView-2 satellite quantitative data on global ocean bio- optical properties TOPEX / Poseidon / Jason • Started in 1992 • Joint US-French space mission from an orbit 1336 km above the ocean surface • Measures global sea level with unparalleled accuracy every 10 days • “Active” sensor • Uses radar altimetry to measure the precise distance between the satellite and sea surface by measuring the round-trip travel time of microwave pulses bounced from the spacecraft to the sea surface and back to the spacecraft. The height (or "relief") of the sea surface is caused by both gravity (which doesn't change much over 100's of years), and the active (always changing) ocean circulation. The normal slow, regular circulation (ocean current) patterns of sea-surface height move up and down (warming and cooling and wind forcing) with the normal progression of the seasons . .. winter to spring to summer to fall. Using theory of ocean dynamics, TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason sea-surface heights can be used to calculate how much heat is stored in the ocean below. The year-to- year and, even, decade-to-decade changes in the ocean that indicate climate events such as the El Niño, La Niña Sea-surface height is the most modern and powerful tool for taking the "pulse" of the global oceans. Radar altimetry Ex: Altimetric Studies of Ocean Tidal Dynamics Figure 1. The principal lunar diurnal tide O1 from the TPXO.5 global assimilation solution. White lines delineate tidal phases with an interval of one lunar hour (Ray et al., 2005). Ex: Merging altimetry and thermal imagery to estimate velocity in ocean boundary currents • The highly variable flows along ocean boundaries are of particular interest due to the extensive use of these regions by humans and marine species. We combine two types of satellite observations, altimeter sea surface heights and velocities derived from tracking thermal patterns, to provide regular maps of sea surface currents. Preliminary results show the regular formation of cyclones and anticyclones in the East Australian Current.
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3 Latest JASON data http://topex-www.jpl.nasa.gov/science/jason1-quick-look/ …the mission continues… •O S TM Scheduled May, 2008 from Vanden-berg Air Force Base, California
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course EAS 104 taught by Professor Brown during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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08 - What were you doing at 5:30 am this morning Recorded at Purdue Seismic Station Earthquake 5.2 5.4 magnitude 5 km deep(3.1 miles felt over 500

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